EUMCC REPORTS

The following list of reports can be used to look for possible money laundering activity in Financial institutions.

Cash-In and Cash-Out of Large Transaction Reports

Many Financial institutions prepare, or have systems that generate, reports of cash-in and cash-out. Often these reports include transactions that exceed a certain threshold. Many money transmitters, for example, have established identification requirements at levels below the €3,000 threshold. Such reports can help identify customers who may be structuring transactions to evade BSA reporting and recordkeeping requirements or who are engaging in other unusual activity.

Kiting Reports

Issuers of traveler’s checks and money orders and money transfer companies often prepare, or have systems that generate, reports that identify transactions that may involve kiting. Kiting is depositing and drawing checks between accounts at two or more banks and thereby taking advantage of the float — that is, the time it takes the bank of deposit to collect from the paying bank. Reports that indicate kiting may also disclose other unusual patterns of activity possibly associated with money laundering.

Money Transfer Reports

Money transfer companies prepare, or have systems that generate, daily transaction reports and other reports that identify different groupings of transfer activity processed through their systems (e.g., corridor reports showing all transfers from country A to country B in a specific time period). These reports can help identify unusual patterns that may suggest possible money laundering.

Depending on the type of report and the frequency, these reports can help identify unusual customer behavior. Such reports also may help identify unusual behavior of businesses serving as agents of money transfer companies.

€3,000 Instrument “Log”

Reports of cash sales of instruments between €3,000 - €10,000, inclusive, required by BSA regulations, can help Financial institutions identify possible currency structuring patterns. Recorded information can, for example, help identify customers who may be structuring transactions to evade the BSA reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

Clearance Records/Receipts

Issuers of money orders and traveler’s checks prepare, or have systems that generate, daily records of items that have been presented for payment against the issuer’s bank account. Many issuers have designed programs to identify unusual patterns of cleared instruments. Such reports can be extremely useful in the identification of items that may have been used for illicit purposes.

€3,000 Funds Transfer Records

These records, required by BSA regulations, can help money transmitters identify possible structuring patterns. Records of €3,000 or more in money transfers regardless of the method of payment may help identify customers who could be structuring transactions to evade BSA reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

Customer Activity Reports

Some Financial institutions use customer reward programs to encourage repeat use by customers. Reports generated to monitor individual customer responses or general customer activity can be useful in identifying unusual transactions or patterns of transactions.

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